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have seen in years of trading and investing. they have worked in environments in the past. the stocks didn't rally on the weaker projections. more important is the fact that it didn't get crushed as much as it should have. the reaction isn't that note worthy given how wild the stock is. why hasn't it's been benign? remember, we were at 11,000 not that long ago. think about it. instead of the 13,000. we were down 11,000. that is where we are. why were these stucks down before the rise broke out? it hooks like we would be finishing higher for the day. this reminds me of when the greeks went crazy. i think the declines might not have occurred and it pointed to a couple of things. and it makes the market stronger than you would expect and maybe like boundy and not a flood. first they lag their benchmarks and they need to make up ground. the hedge fund managers are expected to beat the s&p 500. where you pay teeny tinie fees. what is the point of giving a manager a share of the profits if they can't do as well as the static machine? as the year ticks by, they are getting frantic. they have
in on january 1. >> tom: meantime, the environment out there, we sought latest g.d.p. revisi yesterday, a slower economy faster than expected. corporate earnings also slowing down. that's happening regardless of what's going on in the political environment. >> it certainly is. earlier this summer, what was really driving stock prices, in my person was two words-- anticipated stimulus. notice, it's removal of uncertainty, and so i think the real question is will we be seeing a trough in corporate earnings in the third quarter, a trough in u.s. g.d.p., in this or the fourth quarter of the year? or might w be seegroughing a little bit later on for other international g.d.p.s. in general, i think a lot of people are anticipating that maybe the worst will soon be behind us, especially because of all this liquidity that's been pumped into the system over the past several months. >> tom: you've crunched numbers and brought some sectors to watch for next three months, including the technology area here with xlk, being the e.t.f. for the technology sector. has had a nice rally over the last 12 months. wh
of cisco, having the experience that you've had at yahoo! tell me how you see the environment changes and where specifically you would expect growth to happen in technology in the next five years. >> well, i think technology in general -- probably the biggest challenge is not so much the social interactions but everybody's talking so much about data. data is very, very hard to mine correctly. so i think you're going to see a push back towards a lot of enterprise apps that really figure out how it get information to the companies so they can actually be more personalized for the user, but easy to say, a lot to do. >> and really quick, on what you're seeing out there, how tough is europe right now for technology? what are you seeing in terms of the global slow down? >> well, europe continues to baffle us in general in technology. it looks like it's getting softer, not stronger. you know, companies that diversified over the past 20 years do make sure they had good portfolios in all the regions, you know, are taking a hit now with europe. i think it's broad based, so it shouldn't be a kno
the bike was the most effective way for me to move around and not spoil the environment that i am in. >> reporter: that is the message they want to pass along. many youngsters joined in. >> parents got together and they decided to create a kidical mass, a ride within their ride. inviting parents and kids riding safely together. >> there were parents and parent teams often connected by one bike. sharing the experience with his son is price stphaols -- priceless. >> for me it is people conneglecting with bikes and there are alternatives to -- communicationing and getting along with bikes and there are alternatives to travel. >> we have not heard of any problems, we will stay on top of this. >> reporter: live in san frsc channel 2 news. >> to find it and other events look for the story under our bay area news tab. >>> a vigil is underway right now for a 12-year-old girl who was killed while riding her bike home from school. the family provided us a photo. she was riding against traffic on nevado boulevard when she was struck by an suv yesterday. her family tells us the 7th grader wan
invest overseas a lot of places where they can make money in a zero interest rate environment. the low interest rates which the federal reserve told us will be that way until 2015 a are also hurting savers. >> they absolutely are. it creates inflation risk. people are penalized. the return if they are investing their savings some place safe the return is not keeping pace with inflation. every year they are losing money. so of course that creates incentive to invest in riskier assets and that's what we had with the crisis, low interest rates then. not as low as now but people are looking for return with the sub prime mortgages. it creates incentives which create significant risk for the system. and i think the fed is proceeding with the best of intentions but the risk of what they are doing is tremendous an the benefits are incremental at best. >> it has been about the fed providing stimulus. what kind of fiscal policy would you like to see? >> the solution is not hard but it is having the political will to do it. you have to get spending under control and the defense budget. we are und
it disappointing. now, i think paychex is a well-run business. while the company is facing a tough environment, the quarter wasn't terrible by any stretch of the imagination. it beat it by a penny on a 40 cents basis and 2% year over year. last time i thought that was the hugely important key metric. however, the growth year seems to be decelebrating. especially since that's why i'm thrilled to have marty, the chairman and ceo here to talk about the quarter. mr. mucy, welcome back to "mad money." >> good to be here, jim. >> i've got to oh tell you, i've been through these various downgrades and it's almost like they thought that the payroll numbers had dropped so we have 6.5 to 7% unemployment. the fact is we always thought it was this number that we cared so much about which was the actual 2% revenues number. it suddenly didn't matter. all the people looked at was you guys didn't capitalize on the gigantic increase on employment on the matter. >> we thought it was a good quarter. it met our expectations, client base and client retention all improving. we felt good. it was a good start to the
vulnerable in this environment? >> that is a tough call. i generally don't talk about equities we met. david: i know that tim certainly does. i know that you have some panning ones as well. let's talk about the ones you expect to do well. why do you think that international paper is a good stock. >> they are probably seeing pricing power. contrary to the data we are seeing, we are seeing names like them, really getting prices to consumers. their exposure there, this could mean eight up to 10%, you have seen it react already, it has more upside. david: las vegas. a lot of pickers love this stuff. why do you? >> well, you are still seeing a fair amount of exposure to an operation in singapore. about 30% of the revenue. only about 20% exposure to vegas. the numbers are just terrific. gaming revenue is great, a lot of stocks that are cheap. david: tim and brian larry, thank you for sticking around a little lower than usual. we appreciate it. david: colombia used to be the last place to do business. now, it has become the second-largest economy to all of south america. the man who orchestrated th
environment and perform tasks in a natural environment and be successful, and so modern life of course really impinges upon that. it is particularly acute, of course, for people who are doing shift work but ae also see it in things like jet lag where your biological clock may be messed up just for a few days, so i think the principles are trying to have temporal organization in your life. it is important to do the best that you can to consolidate sleep for a good six to seven hours. when it comes to eating, studies are showing us it is really best if you only eat during your active periods. for most of us that would be during the day and really try to cut out the nighttime or late night meals, and so giving yourself a little light during the active part of your life, making sure you consolidate sleep, getting your eating patterns to be coordinated with when you're active, those are the kind of things that will give you an edge in life. >> fascinating. thank you so much for sharing. we appreciate it. >> thanks, carol. >> we'll be right back. [ female announcer ] research suggests cell health p
what moody's does in this environment, where actually we're discussing whether there will be intervention on the ecb? >> first of all, i think it is very relevant because this would bring spain's rating down to junk levels, which is the lowest of all three rating agencies, so it's a pretty big deal. and then the ecb program can't be implemented until spain actually says they want help. so it depends what happens first. i think it's going to be a slippery slope. finally, we've got the budget coming up tomorrow. there are more painful cuts, it could mean more pain for spain and more pain for the euro. >> there's a lot of tifs in tha. >> you could also argue that all the central banks have been ineffective in generating momentum in the markets right now. so even if they're persistently buying, it's really about risk appetite and sentiment. i don't think there's enough there. central banks could come in and make another announcement, but i think having just made these unprecedented announcements, that that could lead to firefighting. >> what are you targeting? >> lo
. so there is -- it's a very skittish, very fragile environment. >> yeah. obviously, the q2 gdp numbers are old, a little dusty here, but they do not show any acceleration which is what we're trying to find clues to in the back half of the of the year. >> i think what happened is europe had a much bigger effect on business sentiment than many people thought. it's been dampening exports and capital spending which is what the durables reflect. as we moved through the summer and stabilized on europe, normally we might get some acceleration. the problem frou is you have the fiscal cliff and the election. people now have yet another excuse not to do anything. had europe not bled into the summer as long as it did, maybe you'd have gotten that spark in activity. but right now you just don't have it. >> are you taking a lot of solace in what housing's done, what confidence is doing? >> yeah, the housing numbers i think are great. that's one of the reasons the economy hasn't been strong to this point in the cycle. housing is keeping us from really stuttering on growth. we need more in housing, a
of the more mature companies. >> what matters is if you create an environment for people to invest in the united states. the last several administrations i went to washington if intel is going to build this next major manufacturing facility the net present value of the facility in a u.s. compared to a lower corporate tax environment is $ billion. it's a tough sell to be patriotic and have that facility in the u.s. cut the corporate tax rate down to a competitive level. i think technology will continue to advance. the problem is keeping the good ideas in the u.s. and create jobs. >> it can happen in spite of things or you can help or be sort of in the way? >> or you can facilitate for an economy which is growing. what we do with foreign graduate students, taxpayer money pays to educate them to get thai masters and ph.d.s and tech topics and our immigration policy says go home. it's a brilliant philosophy. >> you said the growth in intel will be abroad. whatever the tax policy is, i imagine you have to go abroad on manufacturing and engineering. you want to go to the customer. even i
are taking risks. >> oh, sure, in this environment, i mean, you know, we're watching liquidity like a hawk because there's great sense tomorrow morning it could go the other way, in effect you don't invest as much, you don't take as much risk. >> how would you counter the argument that businesspeople and the wealthy have had their way for the past 2030-years as they've increased their lead in terms of income disparity and gotten richer and richer, and you would have hoped that some of that would have trickled down, if it works you would have hoped the average person would have participated in the good times and haven't and you need a president that is going to come in for the powerless people that aren't able to set policy and pay to go do things and you need someone that will represent them in the future. how was is that pretty damned good? >> yes, sir. >> you can take this. thank you for writing it for me. >> i'll get you a job at "the new york times." the reality is as follows. the whole focus has been on how the quote, one percenters or ten percenters, how the top earners moved ahead o
lockheed's f-35 program most at risk. goldman sachs says the current downsizing environment increases the potential for m & a activity. with the clock ticking down to fiscal armageddon, expect defense companies to send out layoffs after the holiday. that's your q-4 channel check for defense. i'm jane wells. >> all right. so let's dig deeper into which defense stocks could feel the biggest impacts if we go off the fiscal cliff. >> joining us is jeremy devaney. do you think we'll see those sequestration cuts in defense next year, $55 billion? >> good afternoon, bill. thanks for having me on. yes, we definitely think the fiscal cliff is coming, especially the sequestration cuts or the budget cuts for the defense department. right now the polarization up on the hill is not allowing for any movement in legislation to resolve that issue. >> all right. so let's talk about sort of breaking this down. first off, when are you expecting the defense companies to alert employees that their jobs will be cut? is that october 1st or november 2nd? what's your end date? >> sure. we're looking at novemb
know, but it's important to understand about the libyan security environment that it's very porous. there's abundant weaponry. that's all been stolen from gadhafi's arsenals during the revolution. there is in security services. so, when we talk about preplanned, we have to decide whether it was something that had been planned months in advance, weeks in advance or something that was hastily put together, a couple of cell phone calls half an hour before. they knew ambassador stevens was there and seized the moment. so it may have been planned, but 30 minutes beforehand. >> and of course we get into the whole question of immediate aftermath. when did u.s. intelligence now, when did they tell the white house, which is going to become a crucial issue, who is to blame for any errors that may have happened. from your reporting and you've done a lot in terms of studying these jihadist and extremist groups, what i find incredibly ironic here is that these groups linked to al-qaeda wanted moammar gadhafi to be killed. that was something that was accomplished by the united states, who are th
environments where you can fully test things. there's lots of thorns around the edges. it's not as simple as that. there's implementation, lots of other things, not the least of which is that you pointed out that none of these tools are static. we are used to having things you can hope to build long enough to fully test them and that is not the situation with online emerging digital tech elegy and i'm ironman. if we create a system with the data produced is also feeding back to create smart supply, to feedback vendors and developers have the best information about what is happening in classrooms by observing, looking at data from the sea was happening, talking users come and see they need help navigating to create a much more powerful and intelligent supply. so all of this is really important in the bottom line is it's important because previous panels put it out. ready to fully invest and improve the opportunity for every american from adults undereducated in these new jobs to young children who are not having the same language as their neighbors perhaps. >> thank you for a match. our ne
's get straight to the markets and talk about investing in this environment. gentlemen, good see you. thank you so much for joining us. dan, let me kick this off with you. what do you think happened at end of the day today? seems this market has been trading on some worries last several sessions. yet, we did see some optimism at end of the day. >> absolutely. it's a case of perhaps, you know, still do not fight the fed. what we were watching specifically was apple. you mentioned it. we were looking for support on the stock at around 650. wouldn't you know it, it hit their intraday lows. they don't want to see that stock drop. the interesting thing with that is, you know, apple is a bell weather that's really driving the nasdaq 100, driving a lot of these larger cap benchmarks we follow. if you keep that buoyed, you're going to keep the markets buoyed going forward. >> that's a really good point. i guess, david, for those fund managers who have not owned apple, they're going to be playing catch up fourth quarter so their fund looks better by year end, right? >> it's possible. you have
return environment. >> that's what he wants. he wants everybody searching for yields so they put the money somewhere else. they put it to work. they buy a house. this is exactly what he's hoping for, isn't it? >> it's -- it's what he's hoping for. he's hoping for what he would call the wealth effect. and the wealth effect actually is, shall we say, a debatable point. we had a wealth effect out of the housing that led to excesses. so, i would argue that the fed is actually creating more issues down the road. and i can say something positive about it. it's giving the federal government an opportunity to get its house in order. very much like the integration of euro countries back in the last decade where -- >> it's josh. i'm just curious. first of all, i admire your conviction, 35% cash in the midst of a market meltup. i guess john talks about how he wants his investors to judge him over a full market cycle, understanding the fact he will trail in certain types of market environments. how do you feel about that? are you willing to forego-g a rally of this strength and breadth to ul
is slowing. a lot of people say, look, what they're really doing is saying even in this environment we're going to make far more money than we have in the previous downturns if we get it at $6 in earnings, which is well below what they think they can earn. we'll still pay the dividend. i come back and say the acquisition, which they made and a lot of people were critical of, is working. that the synergies are working. that the costs taken out in regards to manufacturing, look, the world is slowing but it is not a disaster. that's why caterpillar is not at 885. >> do you lump this with the warnings from intel and fedex. it is a global company looking at a slowing global company. >> there isn't anything specifically i saw in the cat release that was saying we are not getting it right. this caterpillar is ready for a downturn unlike any other caterpillar we have had. a lot of times caterpillar had terrific numbers in the presentation about how low earnings have been in the slowdown. the headlines for this story, i'm sure he's at home saying, that's not what i said. i did not say things we
wanted to drop out in my class let that be a problem. if you create an environment where they want to be, education nation, i saw a video, massachusetts and it is unbelievable. 24 different career choices and veterinarian clinic. 16 day auto shop. the list goes on but it is different. not more of the same. there's one thing in the report that i think although it wasn't the focus is so important and it was mentioned by both analysts, the early intervention. i am a believer in systems. you can't take a piece of a whole system. even change dramatically one piece and assume the whole thing will change. i don't believe that is true. the thing about public education in america that is troubling to me is when they say no system can produce anything other than what it was designed to produce. in this country when we graduate 75% of the kids year after year after year unless you are african-american or hispanic is closer to 50% as the report points out the rate doesn't fluctuate like the dow jones average. it is constant because the system was designed to do that. what we have to do is talk about
the findings from qe1 and think we will get the same effects. i think the environment is different. you cannot take all that evidence and a flight it. >> we will have the fed chairman remarks live on fox business at 12:30 p.m. there will be plenty of questions on inflation, economic conditions, when the fed starts pulling back on monetary policy, still many questions regarding qe3. connell: rich, thank you very much. all that uncertainty that surrounds our economy could be what leads us back into recession. brian was perry joins us now. he has been optimistic about the economy. >> i did not disagree with one word he just said to dagen and fewer viewers. he is absolutely right. the government is too big. we have all of these taxes to worry about if we do not cut spending. it has become the biggest financial institution in the world and that is why we are more worried today about uncertainty and what has happened is the risk reward ratio has changed for business. there is more risk and potentially a lot less rewards. businesses are holding back and that increases the odds of recession. the three
mass-oriented environments where it's pegboard and they point you to aisle four, go find it yourself. we've done research that shows in certain categories, especially foundation, the consumer shop en masse, she spends more than when she buys in prestige where she buys in the store to the exact match foundation. the value proposition is around service which is why in this market, in north america, very high percentage of the total beauty business that's done in prestige like macy's because of that service proposition and a relatively low, absolute value differential in the price point. >> we continue to see companies go in and have difficulty in china. one company told us last week that western companies are going into china with western views about the chinese consumer and their loyalty and they're finding that that consumer passes them by in different ways. are there lessons you've already figured out on that front? >> we've been doing business in asia for 30, 40 years. and we first started in japan in the early '70s, then expanded into korea and hong kong. we've been in china doing
flexible business models. the consumer environment has been choppy and they can respond quickly to that. >> if you like family dollar can you speak to the margin as they sell more lower end products how do they recover and compare and contrast that to dollar general which has margin upside? >> well, they are selling more food and other consumables. they have been adding additional items into the store. it has put pressure on gross margin. they are using that strategy to drive traffic. that brings customers in day in and day out. they do have the lowest margin in the dollar store sector around 7.5%. dollar general is north of 10%. i think that is the real opportunity for family dollar. they can do things to offset the pressure. they can do more private label. they can do more global sourcing and manage the store better, as well. >> going to leave it there. thanks for your time. what is your retail trade? >> i probably stick with target or kohl's store. if you look at the fiscal cliff. there is a $610 billion impact. 400 billion comes right out of consumer pocket. if you have less money i
comings of the contemporary media environment is while debates are supposed to be occasions where candidates thrash out matters of consequence thoughtfully and in detail the outcomes are often judged by snippets that are more about personal character than issues or problems. and i'm curious to know is it just that we talk about the moments, write about the moments, rerun the moments, but that people 40 are actually watching the debate trying to figure out who to vote for the moments don't resonate with them? >> i actually don't agree with that. i do think there are -- look, there are times where we genuflect over something that happens in a debate or on the campaign trail that might not matter a lot. but look, like for example in the primary you won't be surprised to hear me say this, i thought the $10,000 bet moment spoke to who mitt romney is. it spoke to what his, you know, what his life is like. it spoke to, you know, a lot of things about mitt romney. how out of touch he is. so i think -- and people really focused on that for a week after that debate. so i think there are mom
on thursday. in an environment when many people were frightened that the food business would take a big hit courtesy of that horrendous drought, both of these companies reported nothing short of phenomenal quarters. both stocks are trading at or near their 52-week highs, but if you want to put a resurgence of the packaged food group, i now think you've got to look elsewhere. you want a stock that hasn't run. even as it's benefiting from the exact same trends as conagra and general mills. why were their quarters so good? what pieces of evidence can we glean from their earnings reports? this is fun for me. it should be fun for you. i want to put fun into this, for heaven's sake. that's how you make more money. first, both general mills and con agra indicated the commodity costs can be moderating. now they've got two major food companies saying it's not as bad as you think. conagra is probably more sensitive to raw costs and they slashed their cost inflation guidance down to 3% and the ceo there had been the most honest about how bad inflation has been for his company. second, a little cue fro
. >> sure. >> so as you look forward, how do you invest in an environment that looks like we're going to have easy money for a long time? you've kind of changed the typical asset allocation most people go to. >> oh, yeah, it's a crazy world. at oppenheimer we're talking about the new 60/40. people's portfolios are perfectly positioned for the past. they're positioned for 2008. we're still seeing 30 billion a quarter flowing into core bond funds, which are yielding negative in real terms, below inflation. that's madness from our point of view. investors have to understand that the notion of what is safe and what is risky has to be adjusted a little bit. safe doesn't mean securities that have a lot of interest rate risk and no yield. that is not what safety means to us today. again, given the plentiful liquidity and what we think is a moderate global recovery, we think it's safe to move out into more credit-oriented investments, more higher income investments. >> high yield corporate? >> high yield continues to look good in our view. it's come that lot but far from how tight it can get.
environment that can more than triple operating income. cost savings with chrysler and new products. so combined with discounts to the group and mr than tripling operating income -- >> there's the bell. thanks. >> good job though with the 30 seconds. >> matt kirk out in san francisco, your 30 seconds begins now. >> sure. so we like cincinnati bell. it's a regional telecom operator but they also run a rapidly growing data center business. while the market has seen this stock as a legacy telecom, no free cash flow and dividend, in reality they reinvest back into the data center. management recently announced plans for a partial ipo. we think on a sum of the parts basis the stock is worth 7 to $8. there's still some up side left. >> wow, with five seconds left on the clock. good job there. ryan, we'll go to you. >> my idea is jack in the box which is a company most people associate with being an operator of its namesake, fast food chains. i think it's undervalued because there's a misperception of what jack's business is. it is nearing the completion of a seven-year refranchising efforts.
the environment, but to not is potential for 50% of the market, if something happens there, that could dramatically impact results. >> darren, in terms of some of the chinese internet, very bullish on cena. talk about valuation, though, and where people -- you see a myriad. cena actually is a value play in the my of a lot of these guy that is are grossly overpriced. but again, give us an idea of where you see kegger both on earnings, but more importantly if you're worried about the corporate governance. >> corporate governance is by far the biggest risks in china. we've seen stories in the small micro cap side. largely the bigger companies have avoided some of the stig ma -- stigma attached, but it's a risk. there's no way you can fully know what's going on. >> but isn't that absurd as a fund manager to say i don't know what they could do? with all due respect, that seems like a huge risk to take. >> i think if you are willing to take -- like you said, it's a little bit of a value play. there's a discount in the name, in my opinion, for the potential growth. you'll see the largest inte
understands how to create an environment for jobs so we can help families and make life work for people again. that's really what we're talking about. >> eric, whoever wins, do they have a mandate, if the president is reelected, is that a mandate for saying yes, we go forward with health care and forward with the tax plan? >> i this i there's no question that this is a mandate on whether you think government needs more tax dollars right now or we need to address the situation of the spending and n inc incurrence of more debt. we need to find a way to come together and have to act like folks do and their families and businesses and say normal reasonable people can disagree but let's find ways to work together and set aside those disagreements. >> if the president is reelected, how do you work with him and what is the proposal that's put on the table to try and move forward at some point? >> again in the hypothetical, if the president is reelected, i do think that he said he's not signing a bill that will keep taxes and the rates where they are. now we'll have to see what kind of sort of growt
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in quiet and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. (testimonial section) (testimonial section) (testimonial section) did you know, 94% of people who use lyric would recommend lyric to a friend or loved one. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's advanced technology, call or visit for a risk--free 30--day trial offer. you'll also get a free informational dvd and brochure. why wait? hear today what a little lyric cacan do for you. lyric from phonak. life is on. >> that was the quarter 2 ending balance before we brought another round of capital. [talking over each other] stuart: private equity put the money in. >> absolutely. that is how we raise our f -- stuart: it wasn't being capital? that was brian hansel defending his green truck company. smith electric. tune in 9:20 weekdays. check the markets because we are down some more. up 116 points for the dow. 133 is where we are now. of the price of gold. we are down $7 at $17.73. where are we now? $91 a barrel. not much change. and noticeable drop in gas prices ov
regulators in a post-bailout environments to do something like that. it really is absurd stuff. the latest is his trying to dispel the notion. you are an investor, think about it. it does not want to look desperate in this market. they see blood in the market and he can never sell for the premium he is seeking. i would take everything, but to our viewers, take what john thain says with a grain of salt. he is never right in the past. dagen: what about the possibility mentioned of how the banks are out of the picture in terms, do you think it ended up getting sold it would end up in the private hands? >> i don't know. people talk about canadian banks. another reason the canadian banks are in good shape is because the regulators are little tougher, but we should point out they are smaller. i don't know if they're regulators will allow a purchase. not an insignificant firm right now. people say which was sold for at least $10 billion, but you have to assume it has debts. it could be a fairly substantial sale. that is big enough to hit the radar screen of a lot of regulators. the uk regulators
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)